Monday, August 06, 2007

Thinking It Over

Ever since we returned from our Star Flyer trip to Greece, we have talked about when we can possibly do another Star Clippers trip. The destination is less important than the time of year -- I work for a school and get plenty of vacation time, but can only take the days at certain times of the year without putting undue hardship on the institution. We are thinking that 2009 will be the year, and the schedules aren't posted yet for that summer. So there is plenty of time to ponder. And to save.
. . . .
Ah, there is the obstacle. This vacation was not inexpensive. And the next one, of course, will be less so. I've been trying to think of ways to make it more likely that we can do this in 2009. It will require some drastic measure of some sort.
. . . .
For several years I had a little part-time job for about seven hours per week, doing transcription for a podiatrist. It paid awfully well. Then this past spring, it pretty much dried up as the foot doctor switched to a voice-activated transcription system. The income from the podiatrist could have been dedicated to the next Star Clippers adventure. I've been thinking about contacting other medical offices in the area to see if they have need of an at-home transcriptionist. I have thought about contacting one of the large transcription firms, either the one I worked for years ago or another that hires part-time at-home workers.
. . . .
The other thing I have considered for the first time is possibly making quilts and selling them. I have never wanted to do this. I was always afraid it would take the joy out of sewing. Yet I keep making quilts and there are only so many beds, so many occasions, so many gifts. I wonder if I should try to sell one and see how it feels.
. . . .
The school store last year took on a new format and one of the features was employee crafts for sale. The store gets 10 percent. Jewelry makers and knitters showed up like wild fire. Someone asked me if I was going to try to sell my quilts.
. . . .
Now I am thinking about it. I am thinking that perhaps I will make a baby quilt entirely from scraps and left-over batting that I have on-hand, place it in the store, and see if it sells. If so, I'd do another. The families that send their children to the school are people of means, people who would not bat an eye to spend $50 or $75 for a baby quilt. I'm really tempted.
. . . .
What do you think?

10 comments:

Mrs. Goodneedle said...

I've sold quilts and I didn't like the feeling, for me it DID take the spirit out of the process; at least for me. But that's just me. I wasn't putting $$ away for anything as special as you have in mind, either. Try it... keep track of your expenses and see if it's worth it to you. You are one of the most prolific quilters I know!

Ms. Jan said...

Why the heck not? You are such a prolific quilter and you've got nothing to lose, right?

Connie W said...

After I started my longarm business, I once wished I could just make up quilts, as you have described, and sell them instead of doing quilts for others. But I never have done so, perhaps someday. I keep so busy now that I don't find time to do both. I've been curious as to whether or not it would be profitable. I'm guessing it depends on finding the market you would be looking for.

QuiltingFitzy said...

I had a business making photo memory quilts. I.loved.it.

You have nothing to loose and experience to gain!

PS...try looking at ingdirect.com for a really easy way to save. They have an internet savings account that pays 4.5% and I have been using them since 2001 with no issues. If you have any ?, drop me an email. I'm just a really happy customer 8^)

DPUTiger said...

I would do the test balloon as long as there's no commitment. Any time I've done quilting that doesn't come from "hey, this looks fun!' I have not enjoyed the process at all. Deadline sewing for gifts is preferable to doing request sewing in my book.

Do the "test quilt" and see how it feels. If it works for your creative process, then set sail! :)

tami said...

I think it could be a great way to earn money. Just make the things you want and put them in the store instead of making things specifically FOR the store. Every year I make more crafts than I have things to do with. I just love the process. At Christmas time I take pictures, put them on a free photo site and send a link to my coworkers with prices. It's a great way to make money from things I have already had the pleasure of making and really have nothing to do with.

Laurie Ann said...

It's worth a try. If it doesn't sell, then you'll be all ready for the next baby shower!

Sharon said...

i agree with the others posts, Nancy. The more of your scraps you use, the better the profit, of course. But remember that when you use $9.00 per yard fabric, that $50-$75 amount seems to dwindle. Of course, stash is stash, but still...when we make our charity quilts, we use the fabrics that were on sale or the best bargains, or our cut scraps. I don't like the feeling of parting with one that I've spent fussy time with, but, heck, an irish chain or a turning 20 is just fine.

Pam said...

If you are using bits of stash that might otherwise just sit there for years then you would be able to make a bit of money. I don't think as far as dollars per hour you would be making a really good wage though.

I can see why you would want to take another trip on the sailing ship. It sounded like the most amazing holiday ever. I am thinking I would love to go myself. Maybe when my husband retires it could be our treat. I just loved reading about your trip. Thanks so much! And Happy 40th Anniversary!!

kdmade said...

etsy, etsy, etsy, etsy...

Try the school store, though:) You have NOTHING to lose!!