Tuesday, November 06, 2012

Voting Day, 2012

Well, there was a big brouhaha this summer about the possible requirement to show a photo ID in order to vote in the Presidential election. One faction adamantly stated that voter fraud was rampant and needed to be stopped; this could best be done by requiring the photo IDs. The other faction just as insistently opined that this whole notion was just an effort by the one party to prevent the other party (where people, apparently, were less likely to have a photo ID) from voting.

Being inclined to the latter position, I hastened to consult my personal Man In Washington, who told me, "Well, Mom, there are more reported incidents of death by vending machine than there are instances of proven voter impersonation." I loved it.

So I thought of him this morning when I voted. Arriving at 7:07 (polling place had opened at 7:00), there was a long line and I was #48 in my ward. I hand my wallet firmly closed in my handbag; no way was I going to be intimidated into going along with the nonsense of having to prove who I am. I had plenty of time to prepare a little speech on deadly vending machines (and coconuts!). Then I noticed that showing the photo ID sped up the process considerably, pulled out my license, and entered the booth.

My civic duty completed, I hurried on to work, arriving almost on time. And pondering the possibility of somehow choking to death on a piece of coconut custard pie . . . .

12 comments:

Anonymous said...
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Sue said...

Hi Nancy
I have read why you vote on this day but I still don't get it. Our elections are always a Saturday and here in Australia a country of just over 20 million people, everyone over the age of 18 has to vote in a local, state and federal elections. I've seen lots of I've done my voting now you go vote too.
I have worked as a polling official at our elections and no matter where you vote our system is the same - pencil and paper and numbers.
Is it right that my understanding there will be many people who won't go and vote and then complain about the result, here that isn't an option, the only option is called a donkey vote - go get your name marked off the electoral roll, take your voting papers and don't vote or write rude notes on them or even draw rude pictures on them and then place them in the ballot box for those who count them to see how stupid some people are.
Sorry I got long winded but it is really interesting here in oz with all our morning TV covering your election. Sue

Sue said...

seems they didn't like comments, I also got abused on my blog. It also is now deleted.

Suzan said...

No ID needed where I voted. I was ready but no one asked.

Lori said...

Hi Nancy! I don't understand all of the grumbling about voterID. Today we need an ID the get an Xray, get thru the security and on a plane, just about anything so why wouldn't we need an ID to cast a vote for the person we would like to lead our country? I really don't believe it is to intimidate voters.

Linda said...

I agree with Lori.

Lori said...

That photo is hilarious! Oregon is all mail in, so no photo ID here. I don't see anything wrong with it though as we do have to show it for everything else, including sudafed! lol

Janet O. said...

I am a poll worker and in my state you must show ID--have had to for years. But there are many options, not just a driver's license. The most startling thing I encounter are women who have absolutely no ID in their own name. They don't drive, they are not on their utility bills, motor vehicle registration, or home mortgage. I got two such women right in a row in this election. They don't even have a checking account with their name on it. We usually manage to find a way for them to identify themselves and I think it serves as a great wake up call for them to see the need to establish a "footprint" for themselves, and not just be a shadow to their husband's identity.

Barbara Anne said...

I had my ID and voter's registration card out just to speed up the process. We were the 746th and 747th to vote in our polling place where there are 1900 registered voters. Not bad for noontime!

What is insane here, is that Virginia has sent out new voter's cards about two months before the last 3 elections. What's up with that? Do they hope some folks will show up with the wrong card?? What a waste of trees.

Ah, coconut custard pie! That was my Dad's favorite and you've flung a craving on me. Choking on it? What a way to go! Not really, of course ...

Hugs!

Bobbi said...

Lori & Janet - One of the primary issues in PA was the short amount of time to obtain valid ID between the law implementation date and election day. That and it had the most restrictive qualifying ID's that would be permitted, as the law was written. As Janet points out, there are many women who have nothing in their own name that would have qualified them to vote in PA. Their name might have been changed since birth and they would have had to supply (all) marriage and divorce documents during the process of getting their valid ID if they didn't already have one.

Many Philadelphia (especially) elderly were born in the south to midwives, have no birth certificates - so have no way to vote even if they have been appropriately and legally voting for decades. My friend Liza's elderly and very frail father so spent three trips to the DMV and many hours before he got a valid non-driver's license. (Gee, he should have simply renewed his license and been driving?) If someone was born in another state, obtaining a new birth certificate can be a chore - some states require an application in person. So travel to that state just to get another birth certificate (I don't have my original, do you?) would be impossible or onerous and costly at best.

Voting is a right, not something we choose to do like travel in a plane. We need to make it easy enough for people to legally participate without allowing in person voter fraud to occur. But as Nancy's son pointed out, that's rarer than hen's teeth.

quilt for fun said...

Thanks, Bobbi, for explaining the difficulties of the Pennsylvania law. Not only is it potentially expensive and difficult to get the required ID, but a leader in the Pennsylvania legislature came right out and declared openly that this law was designed to make it easier for a particular candidate to be elected. I like Sue's post - it should be much easier to vote in America.

OT Quilter said...

I could write volumes. I have voted in every election, local and national, for more years than I care to admit. Voting always makes me feel grateful that I have that right and responsibility. And in all these years, I have never once been asked for identification; only my signature on the voter roles and the ballot slip. These attempts at voter suppression are appalling. Read the article about one of the men behind the movement in the latest New Yorker.